Russia hacks Microsoft: It’s worse than you think

Original Introduction to the topic
Another day, another hack of Microsoft technology. Ho-hum, you might think, this has happened before and will happen again — as surely as the sun rises in the morning and sets at night. This time is different. Because this time the targets weren’t Microsoft customers, but rather the top echelons of Microsoft itself. And the hacker group, called Midnight Blizzard, or sometimes Cozy Bear, the Dukes, or A.P.T. 29, is sponsored by Russia’s Foreign Intelligence Service (and has been since at least 2008). And this time, the hack might persuade the federal government to finally take a harder line against Microsoft’s and Windows’ continuing vulnerabilities.

Hacked by a simple, basic trick
Midnight Blizzard is well known for its sophisticated cyberattack capabilities, including the Solar Winds supply-chain attack. That malware was then distributed to thousands of the company’s customers, among them eight or more federal agencies, including the US Department of Defense, Department of Homeland Security, and the Treasury Department, and tech and security firms, including Intel, Cisco, and Palo Alto Networks. Microsoft said that hack was “the most sophisticated nation-state cyberattack in history.” The hack also involved infiltrating Democratic National Committee servers, stealing emails and documents, and releasing them publicly. This time around, though, Midnight Blizzard didn’t have to build a sophisticated hacking tool. To attack Microsoft, it used one of the most basic of basic hacking tricks, “password spraying.” In it, hackers type commonly-used passwords into countless random accounts, hoping one will give them access. Once they get that access, they’re free to roam throughout a network, hack into other accounts, steal email and documents, and more. In a blog post, Microsoft said Midnight Blizzard broke into an old test account using password spraying and then used the account’s permissions to get into “Microsoft corporate email accounts, including members of our senior leadership team and employees in our cybersecurity, legal, and other functions,” and steal emails and documents attached to them.

Why this is more than just a black eye
The hack, especially because it was accomplished so easily, is a black eye for Microsoft. But it’s even worse. It comes after a series of high-profile hacks of Microsoft technologies that angered the feds so much they’ve been looking into Microsoft’s security protocols.

Key takeaways
– The recent hack of Microsoft by the Midnight Blizzard hacker group shows that even the most basic hacking tricks can lead to devastating attacks.
– Microsoft’s violation of basic cybersecurity rules raises concerns about its ability to protect its customers against hacking, and may lead to federal action against the company.
– The hack has underscored the importance of following best security practices such as patching systems to fight newly found vulnerabilities and using multifactor authentication whenever possible.

Conclusion
The recent hack of Microsoft by the Midnight Blizzard hacker group has put the spotlight on the vulnerability of even the most sophisticated technology to basic hacking tricks. This breach has raised concerns about Microsoft’s cybersecurity protocols and may lead to federal action against the company. It has also emphasized the importance of following best security practices to protect against cyberattacks.

Frequently asked questions
Q: What is the Midnight Blizzard hacker group?
A: The Midnight Blizzard hacker group, also known as Cozy Bear, A.P.T. 29, or the Dukes, is a hacker group sponsored by Russia’s Foreign Intelligence Service, known for its sophisticated cyberattack capabilities.

Q: What is password spraying?
A: Password spraying is a basic hacking trick in which hackers type commonly-used passwords into countless random accounts, hoping one will give them access. Once they gain access, they can infiltrate networks, hack into accounts, and steal sensitive information.

Q: Will the recent hack of Microsoft lead to federal action against the company?
A: The recent hack of Microsoft has raised concerns about the company’s cybersecurity protocols, and federal action against the company is a possibility, as the government has been looking into Microsoft’s security practices.

Lists or Tables
– List of the hacker groups involved: Midnight Blizzard, also known as Cozy Bear, the Dukes, or A.P.T.29.
– List of federal agencies and tech firms affected by the Solar Winds supply-chain attack.
– List of Microsoft products and services that have been targeted in recent high-profile hacks.

Hopefully, Microsoft will take the necessary steps to strengthen its cybersecurity protocols, and that the government will take appropriate action to protect against future attacks.

Newsletter

So subscribe to receive even more amazing deals RIGHT to your inbox!

Leave the first comment

Let us send you
my best tools
Straight to your inbox

Drop you email below and I will send you the best tools to grow your business, for free!